orasbanner
Join #PM Chat on DiscordFollow PM.net on Twitter Follow PM.net via RSS

Welcome to PocketMonsters.net

PocketMonsters.net is a fansite dedicated to all things Pokémon (ポケモン) and Pocket Monsters (ポケットモンスター). We are the premier site for news and information about all aspects of the franchise from around the world. We cover the Anime, indexing the music, the Trading Card Game, the Games, the variety shows, have a large imageboard, forum and much more. Follow us on Twitter and Subscribe to our RSS Feed for the latest updates!
News Tag Filter: Interview
Nov 01

Interview - Meet the Makers of Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Let’s Go, Eevee!

Posted by Sunain | November 1st 2018 at 02:54 AM EDT
Tags: Interview, Junichi Masuda, Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu!, Pokémon: Let’s Go, Eevee!
Comments: 0
Permalink
The official English Pokémon website has posted an interview they conducted with GAME FREAK’s Junichi Masuda and Kensaku Nabana about the games Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Let’s Go, Eevee!

Image

Meet the Makers of Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Let’s Go, Eevee!

GAME FREAK’s Junichi Masuda and Kensaku Nabana share their insight into the development of the latest Pokémon adventure.

The first Pokémon RPG adventure for Nintendo Switch, Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee!, is almost here, and the excitement continues to grow. To learn more about the process that went into the adventure's creation, we had a chat with two members of GAME FREAK inc.—the developers of the games. Join us as we talk to Junichi Masuda, one of GAME FREAK's founders and the director of Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee!, and Kensaku Nabana, the games' lead environment designer. Both creators were kind enough to share their thoughts on the production of these upcoming titles.

Creative Inspiration

Image

Pokemon.com: Where does the original creative spark for a new Pokémon adventure usually come from? What are the first things you work on when get that spark?

Junichi Masuda: I think that no matter who you are, if you are a creative person, a new project begins with the desire to do something specific or figure out the solution to a specific problem. For example, we have Nintendo Switch, which can be used in the living room as a home console. So we have the issue of getting people into the room to play the game. That's where we started with this project—through that concept.

The ideas of connecting the games to Pokémon GO, of creating the Poké Ball Plus to be able to use it to catch Pokémon, and of two-player multiplayer were ideas we came up with to solve that problem. We had this goal in mind and then thought about what kinds of features to implement that would meet that goal. It's the same when I create music. I always try to think about who the listener will be and what situation they will be in when listening to the music, and then I make music to fulfill that kind of image in my mind.

Pokemon.com: Mr. Masuda, these are the first games you've directed for Nintendo Switch. What opportunities afforded by the new hardware were you most intrigued by?

Masuda: At first glance, it's a complicated piece of hardware—you can connect it to the television, you can take it out with you in handheld mode, there's a touch screen, you can take off the controllers, there are gyro motion controls, and there are a lot of other elements. So in the face of those complications, the approach we took was to look at the ways we could simplify things. We took the idea of using a single controller to play the game to make that all feel less complicated, and that also opened the path to having this kind of local two-player multiplayer where you can share the controllers.

Of course, from a technology perspective, there's the increased power of the hardware, which really allowed us to have much better visuals than we've had before. The communication technology in the system also proved very valuable. For example, we use Bluetooth to allow Trainers to transfer Pokémon from Pokémon GO into Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee!, which is something we wouldn't be able to do without that technology. Behind the scenes, it's kind of a complicated setup, but we always try to make it feel very simple for the player.

A Living World

Image

Pokemon.com: The world of Pokémon feels more active than ever in these games, giving the sense of a living, breathing place. Was that a priority during development, and if so, why did you feel it was important?

Masuda: Because you don't battle wild Pokémon in these games, we wanted to come up with ways to encourage people to run in and go find the Pokémon they want to encounter. Having Pokémon appear in the world lets the player see the ones they want to catch and encourages them to do so, but it also makes the world feel, like you say, more alive and richer as a result.

Image

Pokemon.com: A lot of personality shines through in the way each Pokémon moves and acts. Were there any Pokémon that proved especially challenging in this regard? And do any Pokémon stand out to you as favorites in the way they animate?

Masuda: There are two parts to how we gave the Pokémon's movements and actions a lot of personality. There are, of course, the animations that each Pokémon has, but there are also the patterns in which they move. That was something I came up with near the end of last year. I developed a basic set of rules for how all the Pokémon should move, such as how many steps they should take before they stop and let out a cry or what their behavior pattern is for when they move again.

Once I handed this set of rules over to the programmers, they added their takes on how the individual Pokémon would move for an extra layer of personality. One of the things that was memorable to me was watching one of our movement programmers. He was referring to a video of rabbits walking around when he was creating the movement for Nidoran, which ended up influencing how that Pokémon moves. I wound up really liking Nidoran's final animation.

Image

Pokemon.com: There's a lot of focus on the two main Pokémon in these games—they're featured on the cover, they boast unique moves, and players have new ways to interact with them. Is this bond between Trainer and first Pokémon something you've always wanted to emphasize more?

Masuda: It was something we definitely aimed for in these games—to really increase that ability to form a bond with your partner Pokémon even more than you have been able to in the past. Not only can the Trainer do things to feel they're getting closer to their Pokémon, but the Pikachu and Eevee partner Pokémon in the games do things to make them feel closer to the Trainer. It's kind of a back-and-forth relationship.

Revisiting the Past

Image

Pokemon.com: With this return to the Kanto region and the events of Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition, how do you strike the right balance between familiarity and newness? How do you decide which details to change and which to keep the same?

Masuda: Our approach to development of these games was to appeal to a broad audience. One of the big reasons for that is there are a lot of younger players who maybe didn't have their own smartphones and couldn't join in on the Pokémon GO boom. Because of this, Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee! might be their first time playing a Pokémon video game.

So I wanted to use Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition as a base to introduce the original 151 Pokémon to them—to have them experience catching and training Pokémon, which are core gameplay elements of the Pokémon series. Now, there are a lot of features that were added in later Pokémon games, such as Eggs, Abilities, and held items, that didn't exist at the time of Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition. However, we want kids today to experience something similar to what kids enjoyed 20 years ago. Of course, there are aspects, such as link battling and trading, where we updated the feel to be something more appropriate to modern tastes.

Pokemon.com: What were some of the challenges in bringing these classic environments into a three-dimensional world for the first time? Which locales do you think look especially good or interesting in this new visual style?

Kensaku Nabana: One of the most difficult aspects of updating all the environments and maps for the new hardware and graphic style was that we wanted to keep it nostalgic for fans of the originals while also making it something that looks very inviting and appealing for younger kids. It should always be very clear where you can go, where you can't go, where Pokémon would appear, and where they wouldn't appear.

I think there was a lot of simplicity in those older pixel graphics, which made things like that obvious to the player. The graphics helped communicate things to the player, so you'll see there are quite a few things that we left mostly unchanged. We updated the way you can move around, but we made it very clear where you can go and where you can't go and where you might find Pokémon.

In terms of locales that I think look especially good or interesting, one thing that we did this time around was go back and update all the towns. We redesigned them, pretty much, giving all the towns their own personalities. I think players will have a lot of fun discovering how the locations have changed.

Image

Pokemon.com: Mr. Masuda, you previously directed another pair of games set in the Kanto region with Pokémon FireRed and Pokémon LeafGreen on the Game Boy Advance. What lessons did you learn from that experience that you were able to bring to these games? And what different goals did you have in mind for the Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee! video games?

Masuda: The base concept behind Pokémon FireRed and Pokémon LeafGreen was very different from what we are going for with Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee! Back then, the primary focus was to creates games that could connect with Pokémon Ruby and Pokémon Sapphire, which were the other titles available on the Game Boy Advance. This time around, we're defining what the modern living-room Pokémon RPG experience might be when you play on a home console on a big-screen TV. We're starting from very different places, and as a result, I think you'll see the direction is quite different.

At the same time, probably because of the popularity of Pokémon the Series, I think most Pokémon fans prefer the less scary, kind of cuter, and more inviting look that the animated series provides. So the feel of the world changed to be a little less scary, and the Pokémon started to look less monsterlike and more like the impression that people get from Pokémon today. We're taking those ideas and continuing to implement them in these new games.

Behind the Scenes

Image

Pokemon.com: It's been five years since you last served as director—on Pokémon X and Pokémon Y. Why were these the right games for you to return to that role?

Masuda: I was the one who worked on the base game concept document for Pokémon GO, and even in that original concept, I had the idea of introducing new Pokémon through the mobile game. I wanted to realize that goal by creating games that could connect with Pokémon GO and feel somewhat similar to it without feeling like we were copying it. Given my involvement in Pokémon GO's development, I felt that I was probably the best person to direct these games.

It was also interesting to work with Nintendo Switch. There's a lot of technology packed into the hardware that we were all trying to discover at GAME FREAK. For example, developing the Poké Ball Plus and working with Bluetooth to facilitate the connection with Pokémon GO were both very interesting things that I had a chance to work on as the director this time.

But at the same time, it's important to have the younger generation at GAME FREAK take over the development of Pokémon as a series. I do believe this will probably be, in terms of the main Pokémon RPGs, the last time that I work as the director.

Pokemon.com: You also served as the composer. What was your approach to enhancing/remixing the soundtrack for the Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee! video games?

Masuda: When first approaching the idea of remixing or rearranging the music that I had originally created for Pokémon Red and Pokémon Green, I knew that I would need someone who really understood how I made that music and who is also very familiar with Pokémon. Also, due to the sheer number of songs, I would need someone who could handle that workload and would be able to rearrange the tracks in a classical music style without making huge, sweeping changes.

The person who I got to handle this was Shota Kageyama. He's a musician who's worked on Pokémon games in the past at GAME FREAK. He's really good at making dramatic music, and he's also very consistent and fast in delivering his work. I talked with him, and we came up with a style of music that we felt would be most appropriate for these games.

Again, with the concept of a Pokémon RPG in the modern living room, the music is always going to be on—you're probably not going to turn off the sound like you might on a handheld system. Because the music will be heard throughout the room, everyone will be able to hear it. So we wanted something that would feel kind and inviting—something that everyone in the household would be comfortable hearing.

We've used various music styles in the past, such as heavy metal or techno, and those are obviously things that certain people really like. At the same time, however, those styles can be divisive or intimidating to others. With that in mind, we wanted the music to feel inclusive, and I think Mr. Kageyama did a great job in achieving that.

One of the more interesting things that Mr. Kageyama did comes in the form of how he respected the original music while injecting his own variations on the themes. Most of the songs use the same key and tempo as the original versions, and he keeps things very similar for the first pass of the tune. After the initial loop happens, though, Mr. Kageyama's arrangement kicks in, allowing his own style to come through. I think it'll be very interesting for fans of the original soundtrack to listen to how it's changed.

Parting Words

Image

Pokemon.com: What do you hope new Pokémon players get out of these games? How about longtime fans?

Masuda: It's kind of the same for both audiences, really, but this is the first time that a Pokémon RPG is going to be in the living room on a modern home console. That's really the focus of how we approached the development. I think seeing the Pokémon in HD visuals on a big-screen TV is going to be a lot of fun for traditional fans as well as new players.

The other big thing in these games is, obviously, pretending to throw a Poké Ball to catch Pokémon using either the Poké Ball Plus or a Joy-Con. It's similar to the Pokémon GO style of catching, but we've evolved it to be an even more immersive experience. It lets you feel like you're a Trainer really catching Pokémon in the games. I think that's going to be a lot of fun for all players. My hope is that everyone will enjoy it—not just by themselves, but also with their friends or family joining in on the fun with the two-player gameplay.

Image

Nabana: As a fan of the original Pokémon RPGs, I want first-time players to get to know the setting and world of Pokémon and what it's like to be a Pokémon Trainer. I want them to go out and catch, train, and battle Pokémon—to enjoy all the different elements of the Pokémon RPGs.

For the longtime fans like myself, there's obviously the goal of completing the Pokédex. This time, the way you catch the original 151 Pokémon is very different from how it was in the past, so I think it'll be quite a challenge. The experience also feels very fresh because the technique of catching Pokémon is different in these games.

Other than that, we have some interesting content for longtime fans who are more interested in battling. After you finish the main story, there are Master Trainers that exist throughout the Kanto region. There's one for each of the different species of Pokémon—and each is the master of that Pokémon. That's what they call themselves. They've raised their Pokémon to be extremely strong, and you can go out and challenge them.

For example, if you find a Charmander Master, you challenge that Master Trainer with a Charmander of your own. To defeat that Charmander Master, you need a deep knowledge of how the Pokémon battle system works and you need to have a strong Pokémon. If you do manage to defeat them, you claim the title of Charmander Master for yourself. You can then travel throughout the Kanto region to collect all these different Master Trainer titles.

Source: https://www.pokemon.com/us/pokemon-news/meet-the-makers-of-pokemon-lets-go-pikachu-and-pokemon-lets-go-eevee/

Article edited on 2018-11-01 02:56:52 by Sunain
Oct 27

Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! / Let's Go, Eevee - Developers Interview AU NZ Exclusive

Junichi Masuda and Kensaku Nabana from GAME FREAK answered some of viewers questions received via Twitter and Facebook in this exclusive interview posted by Nintendo AU/NZ.


Dylan: What is your favourite aspect about designing a game? And what are some areas or places that you would like to use as inspiration for the future?
Masuda: In the beginning we visit different places for research. That's when I get new ideas and have moments when I think to myself, "Maybe seeing something like this in the game will make everyone happy." I personally like this part at the start of the process. It's fun and exciting.

Which geographical locations have been inspiring... is a difficult question to answer. When I travel, I learn about the history and interesting building at the places I visit. I have had inspiration from various places around the globe. There have been moments when I though to myself, I would like this place to be a part of our next game. So when I visit different places, I try to learn a lot. Unfortunately I haven't been to Australia or New Zealand yet... I'd like to go there.

Nabana: What do I enjoy the most... Well, I do all things to do with designing and modelling and I enjoy all of it. So if you ask me what I enjoy most it is difficult to answer... But if I must... Once we know the concept of the game from Masuda-san, we crate initial illustrations. That moment when we move from step 0 to step 1 is probably the most enjoyable part for me.

Peddy: How are players encouraged/rewarded for carrying their Pokémon around in the new Poké Ball Plus?
What good things will happen... well, if you put your Pokémon in it, you will hear it cry. It will surely enhance your adventure. If your friends also have Poké Ball Plus, you can have fun conversation with them, asking each other which monsters are in their Poké Ball Plus. And if you bring back your Pokémon into Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee!, there will be a nice little surprise. Please try it for yourself and see.

Stacee: The ultimate question: Pikachu or Eevee?
Nabana: (Holding Eevee Plush) No, no, I say Eevee.
Masuda: (Holding Pikachu Plush) No, no, I say Pikachu.
Nabana: No, this one. Eevee!
Masuda: The idol of this sereis has got to be... (Pikachu)
Nabana: But look at this! So soft and fluffy. Pikachu isn't like this.
Masuda: No, look at these cute cheeks!
Nabana: Well, they are both cute.
Masuda: Yes, both are cute. It's pretty hard to chose one. Which one is everyone else's favourite?
Masuda: (Holding Pikachu Plush) "Choose me!"
Nabana: (Holding Eevee Plush) How about Eevee?!

Barx: Which Pokémon would you want to have as a partner that can follow you around in real life like in Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee?
Masuda: Psyduck! Psyduck!
Nabana: Perhaps Eevee... but maybe Flareon after all. It would be so nice to cuddle it on a cold day in winter. Masuda: (Wouldn't it burn you?)
Nabana: I'm sure it will adjust itself to the right temperature.

Zachary: Which evolution of Eevee is your favourite?
Masuda: Hmm... Eevee will not evolve this time. It doesn't want to, because it wants to enjoy the adventure with you. But, if you're asking about wild Eevee... I guess it would be Sylveon.
Nabana: (Holding Flareon Plush) This is Flareon. See, it's so soft, fluffy and cute.
Masuda: (Touching Eevee Plush) (But this one is soft and fluffy too.)
Nabana: But Flareon looks warmer.
Masuda: You don't like the cold!
Nabana: No I don't. It would be so warm to cuddle.

Samuel: Was it nostalgic to work on Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee! since it is going back to the Kanto region?
Masuda: Yes of course I felt nostalgic. Even seeing one of the lines that a trainer says, I felt very nostalgic remembering it from the past. Not only nostalgic, but I also felt that we were creating something from our memories. Nabana here used to play Pokémon Red and Green as a primary school student. Creating something with people like him has been fun too. This whole experience has made me feel nostalgic, and it also has been fun.

Owen: How does Pokémon GO park work?
Masuda: You can send your Pokémon to Pokémon GO Park by linking Pokémon GO and Nintendo Switch to correspond. Using Pokémon GO, you can choose the Pokémon you want to send, push a few buttons and send it to GO Park. Pokémon set to GO Park all hang out and have fun there. I would really like for everyone to check it out.

Final thoughts?
Masuda: Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee! will be best enjoyed set up with a TV monitor in your living room. Use Pokémon GO and help your friends or parents catch Pokémon. It's a game to be enjoyed in your living room with others, laughing and having fun. Please try it.

Source: https://twitter.com/NintendoAUNZ/status/1055987444875751426

Article edited on 2018-10-27 10:24:27 by Sunain
Nov 09

An Interview with the makers of Pokémon Ultra Sun and Pokémon Ultra Moon!

Posted by Sunain | November 9th 2017 at 08:25 PM EST
Tags: Interview, Ultra Sun, Ultra Moon, Shigeru Ohmori
Comments: 0
Permalink
The following Interview was originally posted on Pokemon.com on November 9th, 2017. The full interview has been archived in our Content Database for future reference.

interview

With the impending release of Pokémon Ultra Sun and Pokémon Ultra Moon for the Nintendo 3DS family of systems, we are growing more and more excited about making a return trip to the Alola region. To learn more about our upcoming expedition, we turned to GAME FREAK, the developers of the game, for a little extra insight. We were lucky enough to chat with Kazumasa Iwao, the director of Pokémon Ultra Sun and Pokémon Ultra Moon, and Shigeru Ohmori, the director of Pokémon Sun and Pokémon Moon and current producer of Pokémon Ultra Sun and Pokémon Ultra Moon, who both shared their experiences and thought processes about designing the latest journey into the wonderful world of Pokémon.

Source: https://www.pokemon.com/us/pokemon-news/an-exclusive-interview-with-the-makers-of-pokemon-ultra-sun-and-pokemon-ultra-moon/
Oct 19

Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon will be the last main series Pokémon RPG games on the Nintendo 3DS

Posted by Sunain | October 19th 2017 at 11:07 AM EDT
Tags: Interview, Nintendo 3DS, X and Y, GAME FREAK, Nintendo Switch, Ultra Moon, UItra Sun
Comments: 0
Permalink
GAME FREAK Game Designer Shigeru Ohmori was interviewed by IGN and he confirmed that Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon will be the last main series Pokémon RPG games on the Nintendo 3DS. It was announced earlier in the year that a new Pokémon title was in development for the Nintendo Switch for release in 2018.

Below are Interview quotes:
"When we were making Pokemon X and Y, we really were trying to push the 3DS system to its absolute limits - which is what we thought we’d done. But when Sun and Moon came around, we completely redesigned the system, and actually ended up pushing the 3DS even further to what we thought was the most we could draw out of it."

"With Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon," explains Ohmori, "we’ve tried to eke that out more and really, really push the system to its absolute limits, and we’re now feeling that perhaps this is the maximum of what we can get out. So we’re really treating Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon as the culmination of our work with the 3DS system."

Source: http://ca.ign.com/articles/2017/10/19/ultra-sun-and-ultra-moon-will-be-the-last-pokemon-rpgs-for-3ds
Sep 06

The Future of Pokémon Video Games - Bloomberg Technology Interviews CEO Tsunekazu Ishihara

Posted by Sunain | September 6th 2017 at 12:48 AM EDT
Tags: Interview, Nintendo, Pokémon GO, Niantic, The Pokémon Company, Nintendo Switch
Comments: 0
Permalink
Yuji Nakamura of Bloomberg Technology interviewed The Pokémon Company CEO Tsunekazu Ishihara and talked about the future of Pokémon video games. Below are excerpts from that interview.

Pokémon GO:

The interview confirmed once again that Trading and one-on-one battles are coming to Pokémon GO.

  • “We’ve only accomplished 10 percent of what Pokémon and Niantic are trying to do, so going forward we will have to include fundamental Pokémon experiences such as Pokémon trading and peer-to-peer battles, and other possibilities.”
  • “Depending on location, there are many Pokémon with different characteristics. So what do we do with those and the real world? One view is to have chilly Pokémon in a cold climate, but then that would also mean that people born on a tropical island won’t be able to catch them. So we are always thinking of how to find the right balance between game design, how our Pokémon should exist, and how players feel about their collections.”
  • “Right now, if you go to the coast you can catch water Pokémon. For example, if you have a setting for electric-type Pokémon (such as Pikachu) to appear at power plants, is that really a good idea for you to find one in such a location -- is it safe, and is it OK regionally? We see it as a very realistic problem.”
  • “On the other hand, it has created a lot of social problems. When too many people gather, it causes mass confusion. Also this isn’t limited to Pokémon Go, but the issue of staring at smartphones while walking is something we have to focus on and think about.”

Pokémon Game for the Nintendo Switch:

  • The announcement caused Nintendo’s stock price to jump as much as 3 percent in U.S. trading, as investors bet the new title will boost Switch sales.
  • “With the Switch, we see it as a chance to create Pokémon that goes deeper and with a higher level of expression. As a result, that makes it an extremely important platform.”
  • “Right now we’re using 7 to 8 inch screens, but on a high-definition TV you can express a whole different world with graphics and sound.”
  • “Until now, games were made as one for one person, but now you can go home and play with everyone -- so how do we tackle these themes, and how do we make sure it’s not complicated?”
  • “I can’t say that we’ll release accessories, but I’d like to think of that possibility.”
  • “Unlike smartphones, the Switch is not a game device that assumes that there’s constant network connectivity. So from our perspective, it’s really not that different from DS or 3DS in terms of connectivity.”

Augmented Reality and the Future of Pokémon

Augmented Reality could play a significant role in games other than Pokémon GO.
  • “With current AR, even if you say Pikachu is there, no one really thinks that. But that reality is just one step away. For example, you’ll be able to find Pikachu, and it can sense this table and jump on it, and you can see its shadow on the table, and then it faces you and starts talking to you. We will see the birth of this reality that is another step up from the current Pokémon Go. And I’ve only mentioned the visual aspect, but you can add haptic and rumble technology to that.”
  • “Voice-activated assistants are increasing. Whether it is Google Home or Amazon or Apple Homepod, there are many of them and we could see these dialogue-based devices give birth of a new form of entertainment.”
  • “Switch is just one of the possible platforms. I think we will open up more possibilities from all these platforms. Playing in a more realistic way should be possible.”

Source: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-09-05/pokemon-s-ceo-hints-at-big-plans-for-games-on-smartphone-switch

Article edited on 2017-09-06 12:50:33 by Sunain
Jun 23

Movie 20 Website Updates with Info on Upcoming Relevant Media

Posted by Adamant | June 23rd 2017 at 12:45 PM EDT
Tags: Anime, Interview, Movie
Comments: 0
Permalink
The official Pokémon movie website has updated. Translations follow:

Media Information


Magazines:
Saturday June 24th: "Cheese!" - Interview (with Kanata Hongo)
Tuesday June 27th: "Sakurasaku Life" - Cover + Interview (both featuring Shiori Sato)
Saturday July 1st: "Monthly Audition" - Interview (with Kanata Hongo)
Saturday July 1st: "Thank You!" - Interview (with Kanata Hongo)

*Note that these are the scheduled publication dates/on-sale dates, and as such are subject to change without notice.

Source: http://www.pokemon-movie.jp/news/?p=2815
Affiliates:

Pokemon Valhalla
LegendaryPokemon.net
Pokemon-Paradijs.com
Entra in PokemonTimes.it !
Pokemon Research and Dvelopment - Project Pokemon
thePokeCommunity
Official Stores:
Pokemon Center Official Site
Pokemon Center Online Official Site
Pokemon Center Store
Official Sites:
Pokemon Official Site
Pokemon Official Japanese Site
Official Site
Japanese TCG Official Site
Pokenchi Official Site
Validators:
Valid XHTML!
Valid CSS 3

News Feeds:
Follow PM.net on Twitter
Follow PM.net via RSS
©2002-2020 PocketMonsters.net
Version 5.1778
Rendered in: 0.12177s Queries: 8

Pokémon, all assorted characters, images and audio are ©GAME FREAK, Nintendo, Creatures, TV Tokyo, ShoPro and The Pokémon Company.
All images, text and audio are used in an editorial context. No site content, information, translations, news, images or otherwise may be reposted to any website without expression permission from the staff.
Current logos by: Juno
Working!
Message